Movie :: Mr Holmes (2015)

Credit:
– Wikipedia
– IMDB

Mr. Holmes is a 2015 British-American crime drama mystery film, directed by Bill Condon, based on Mitch Cullin’s 2005 novel A Slight Trick of the Mind, and featuring the character Sherlock Holmes. The film stars Sir Ian McKellen as Sherlock Holmes, Laura Linney as housekeeper Mrs. Munro and Milo Parker as her son Roger. Set primarily during his retirement, the film follows a 93-year-old Holmes who struggles to recall the details of his final case while his mind begins to deteriorate.

Plot
In 1947, the long-retired Sherlock Holmes, aged 93, lives in a remote Sussex farmhouse with his housekeeper, Mrs Munro, and her young son Roger. Having just returned from a trip to Hiroshima, he starts to use jelly made from the prickly ash plant he acquired there in an effort to improve his failing memory. Unhappy about his ex-partner Watson’s fictionalisation of the story of Holmes’s last case, the fictitious “The Adventure of the Dove Grey Glove”, he hopes to write his own account but is having trouble recalling the details. As Holmes spends time with Roger, showing him how to take care of the bees in the farmhouse’s apiary, he comes to appreciate Roger’s curiosity and intelligence and develops a paternal liking for him.

Over time, Roger’s gentle prodding helps Holmes to remember the case (shown in flashbacks) and why he retired from the detective business. Thirty-five years earlier, a man named Thomas Kelmot had approached Holmes with a request to find out why his wife Ann had changed so much after suffering two miscarriages. Holmes followed Ann around London and observed her taking certain actions – forging cheques in her husband’s name and cashing them, reviewing the details of his will, buying poison from a chemist’s shop, checking train schedules – which made it appear as if she were planning to murder Thomas and inherit his property. Holmes deduced her true intentions: to have gravestones made for herself and her miscarried children, then commit suicide with the poison. Confronting her, he claimed to understand her sense of loneliness and isolation and confessed that he had those same feelings. Ann poured the poison on the ground and asked Holmes if they could share the burden of their loneliness together. Holmes urged her to return to her husband; instead, she killed herself by stepping in front of an oncoming train. Blaming himself for her death, Holmes chose to retire.

A second series of flashbacks recounts Holmes’s trip to Japan, where he met a supposed admirer named Tamiki Umezaki. Years ago, Umezaki’s father had abandoned him and his mother while away in England. In a letter, Umezaki’s father wrote that he was so impressed by the brilliant Sherlock Holmes that he resolved to stay in England forever. Holmes bluntly told Umezaki that his father simply wanted a new life for himself and that Holmes never met him. Umezaki was crushed by this revelation.

In the present, Mrs Munro gradually becomes dissatisfied with caring for Holmes as his overall health deteriorates, especially after he becomes unconscious from an experiment with the prickly ash and now requires more physical care than she feels able to provide. She accepts a job at a hotel in Portsmouth, planning to take Roger with her to work there as well. Roger, however, having spent considerable time with the more learned Holmes, has become dissatisfied with his uneducated mother and his family’s working class status, and tension develops between mother and son.
Holmes and Mrs Munro later discover Roger lying unconscious near the house, a victim of repeated stings, and he is rushed to a hospital. Distraught, Mrs Munro tries to burn down the apiary, blaming Holmes for caring only about himself and his bees. Holmes stops her, having realised that Roger has been stung by wasps; Roger had found their nest and tried to drown them to protect the bees from them, but they swarmed on him instead. Holmes and Mrs Munro burn down the wasps’ nest together, and Roger begins to recover. Acknowledging the value of spiritual and personal connections with others, Holmes tells Mrs Munro that she and Roger will inherit the house and grounds after his death, encouraging her to stay in the home she knows rather than move away in order to take another unrewarding job.

Finally, Holmes realises that Watson’s fictional embellishments of his last case were a sort of kindness towards Mr. Kelmot, so he writes a letter to Umezaki claiming that his father was a brave, honourable man who chose to work secretly for the British Empire. As Roger begins to teach his mother how to care for the bees, Holmes emulates a tradition he saw being practiced in Hiroshima: creating a ring of stones to serve as a place where he can recall the loved ones he has lost over the years.

Movie :: James Bond 007: Spectre (2015)

Credit:
– IMDB
– Wikipedia

Spectre is the twenty-fourth James Bond film produced by Eon Productions. It features Daniel Craig in his fourth performance as James Bond,[12] and Christoph Waltz as Ernst Stavro Blofeld, with the film marking the character’s re-introduction into the series. It was directed by Sam Mendes as his second James Bond film following Skyfall, and was written by John Logan, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and Jez Butterworth. It is distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Columbia Pictures. With a budget around $245 million, it is one of the most expensive films ever made.

The story features James Bond’s first encounter with the global criminal organisation Spectre, marking the group’s first appearance in an Eon Productions film since 1971’s Diamonds Are Forever,[N 2] and tying Craig’s series of films together with an overarching storyline. Several recurring James Bond characters, including M, Q and Eve Moneypenny return, with the new additions of Léa Seydoux as Dr. Madeleine Swann, Dave Bautista as Mr. Hinx, Andrew Scott as Max Denbigh and Monica Bellucci as Lucia Sciarra.

Plot:
On a mission in Mexico City, unofficially ordered by a posthumous message from the previous M, James Bond kills two men plotting a terrorist bombing and gives chase to Marco Sciarra, an assassin who survived the attack. In the ensuing struggle, Bond kills Sciarra and steals his ring, which is emblazoned with a stylised octopus. Upon returning to London, Bond is indefinitely suspended from field duty by the current M, who is in the midst of a power struggle with C, the head of the privately-backed Joint Intelligence Service, consisting of the recently merged MI5 and MI6. C campaigns for Britain to join “Nine Eyes”, a global surveillance and intelligence co-operation initiative between nine member states, and uses his influence to close down the ’00’ section, believing it to be outdated.
Bond travels to Rome to attend Sciarra’s funeral. That evening he visits Sciarra’s widow Lucia, who tells him about Spectre, a criminal organisation to which her husband belonged. Bond infiltrates a Spectre meeting, where he identifies Spectre’s leader, Franz Oberhauser. When Oberhauser addresses Bond by name, he escapes and is pursued by Mr. Hinx, a Spectre assassin. Moneypenny informs Bond that the information he collected leads to Mr. White, former member of Quantum, a subsidiary of Spectre. Bond asks her to investigate Franz Oberhauser, who was presumed dead years earlier.
Bond travels to Austria to find White, who is dying of thallium poisoning. He admits to growing disenchanted with Quantum and tells Bond to find and protect his daughter, Dr. Madeline Swann, who will take him to L’Americain; this will in turn lead him to Spectre. White then commits suicide. Bond locates Swann, but she is abducted by Hinx. Bond rescues her and the two meet Q, who discovers that Sciarra’s ring links Oberhauser to Bond’s previous missions, identifying Le Chiffre, Dominic Greene and Raoul Silva as Spectre agents. Swann reveals that L’Americain is a hotel in Morocco.

The two travel to the hotel and find White’s secret room where they find co-ordinates pointing to Oberhauser’s facility in the desert. They travel by train to the nearest station, but are once again confronted by Hinx, they engage in a fist fight throughout the train in which Mr Hinx is eventually thrown off the train by Bond. After arriving at the station, Bond and Swann are escorted to Oberhauser’s facility. There, he reveals that Spectre has been staging terrorist attacks around the world, creating a need for the Nine Eyes program. In return, Spectre will be given unlimited access to intelligence gathered by Nine Eyes. Bond is tortured as Oberhauser discusses their shared history: after the younger Bond was orphaned, Oberhauser’s father became his temporary guardian. Believing that Bond supplanted his role as son, Oberhauser killed his father, staged his own death, and adopted the name Ernst Stavro Blofeld before going on to form Spectre.That time Swann tells Bond that she loves him. Bond and Swann escape, destroying Blofeld’s facility.

As the Moroccan base was one node in a wider network, Bond and Swann return to London where they meet M, Bill Tanner, Q and Moneypenny; they intend to arrest C and stop Nine Eyes from going online. Swann leaves Bond, telling him she cannot be part of a life involving espionage. On the way, the group is ambushed and Bond is kidnapped, but the rest still proceed with the plan. After a brief struggle in C’s office, he is killed avoiding arrest. Bond is taken to the old MI6 building, which is scheduled for demolition. He meets a scarred Blofeld, who tells him that he has three minutes to escape the building before the explosives are detonated or die trying to save Swann. Bond finds Swann and the two escape by boat as the building collapses. Bond shoots down Blofeld’s helicopter, which crashes onto Westminster Bridge. Bond leaves Blofeld to be arrested by M and leaves with Swann.